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Endorsements

“This is a very timely, rigorous and inspiring book that should be read by everyone. Young people, parents, grandparents, employers and policy makers will all be challenged to radically change their thinking about life journeys both now and into the future.  We all must seize the opportunities and space that a longer, active life offers and support people in learning to move from ‘recreation to re-creation’, one of the great insights that Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott provide.”

Dame Mary Marsh

Non-executive Director of HSBC Bank plc, member of the Governing Body, London Business School, UK

“What happens when working lives extend to 80 years? In this provocative and insightful book the economist Andrew Scott and psychologist Lynda Gratton show what it takes to make this a gift rather than a curse. This book is destined to fundamentally change the way we think about long lives.”

Jasmine Whitbread

Former Chief Executive Officer, Save the Children

“With The 100-Year Life Gratton and Scott have accomplished the near impossible: a book that admirably provides both incredibly important personal advice and a public policy primer. The book delivers sound, straightforward, and vital advice on both the risks and rewards of living much longer than we ever imagined would happen to us, and on how to make better decisions so that we are happier at each life stage. It also lays a strong foundation for policy makers to reconsider the unintended consequences of policies and regulations that both enable and inhibit our ability to live a century-long life to its fullest.”

Alec Levenson

Senior Research Scientist, Center for Effective Organizations, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

“Longevity has been rising in rich countries at a continuing remarkable rate. How having a lot more time will affect our lives –as workers, consumers and family members–is a fundamental social, economic and psychological question that has received far too little thought. The authors discuss the implications of rising longevity for all these aspects of our lives, making sensible predictions and, at least as important, forcing all of us to think about these crucial issues.”

Daniel S. Hamermesh

Professor of Economics, Royal Holloway University of London

“This timely, important, easy-to-read, and intriguing book will make you pause and think, as well as better plan your life. The lengthening of life is a very real phenomenon, bringing with it unpredictable changes and challenges, but also significant opportunities. With Increased life expectancy, how do you get the most from your life? How do you leverage your abilities while at the same time taking advantage of life’s opportunities? Gratton and Scott’s book is a wake-up call for individuals, organizations, governments, and societies. Relevant to young professionals as well as seasoned leaders, this book introduces readers to a new reality: multi-stage professional and personal lives that encompass different careers and transitions. Full of prac- tical insights, this book helps readers to build and live a life worth living.”

Boris Groysberg

Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

“Gratton and Scott’s must-read treatise helps us see crucial patterns in modern life, where we’re headed, and what we can and must do now – in both our private and public worlds – to create pathways for greater human freedom during our expanding time on earth.” 

Professor Stewart Friedman

Director of the Wharton Work/Life Integration Project., Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

“This playfully original book goes well beyond existing single-dimensional discussions of the major demographic transformations of our age, arguing how a different, exciting and challenging new world might be awaiting us. Blending economics, psychology and sociology, it makes a compelling case that as our lives become longer and healthier, the future might just be very very different from what we have known until now.”

Daron Acemoglu

Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

“The lengthening of life is set to have just as profound an impact on our lives as did the explosion in female employment, and the transformation of the nuclear family, which marked the late 20th century. To understand how and why things may change, there can be nowhere better to start than with the fascinating The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity.

Professor Alison Wolf

Baroness Wolf of Dulwich, the Sir Roy Griffiths Professor of Public Sector Management at King’s College London

“Too many books bemoan the economic problems facing ageing societies. This splendid book is quite different. It rightly sees increased rising life expectancy as a wonderful gift, but explores the multiple ways in which individuals , companies and societies must adapt if we are to seize the opportunities before us. Well written and combining insights from psychology and economics, it should be read by anyone who wants to understand how life chances and choices will be transformed in a world where living beyond 100 will become the norm.”

Lord Adair Turner

Senior Research Fellow of the Institute for New Economic Thinking and previously Chairman of UK Pensions Commission

“Living 100 years and working productively for the greater part of them will soon be a reality. That means that life stages as we know them have to be reinvented. Gratton and Scott’s wonderful book prepares us — indi- viduals, organisations and societies – for the possibilities of this brave new world of longevity and teaches us what it will take to thrive in it.”

Professor Herminia Ibarra

The Cora Chaired Professor of Leadership and Learning, Professor of Organizational Behavior, INSEAD

“I found hundreds of insights in this book about the 100-year life. The authors understand implicitly that not only is the world as we know it changing beyond all recognition but the way we lead our lives is too. This book could not be more timely or necessary.”

Julia Hobsbawm

Founder and CEO, Editorial Intelligence Ltd and Honorary Visiting Professor in Networking, Cass Business School

“Getting the right investment of assets across a long life is not straightfor- ward. ‘The 100 Year Life’ presents a provocative and sophisticated analysis of both tangible and intangible assets and in a series of fascinating scenarios show how it can be done. In doing so Gratton and Scott have created a classic.”

Martin Gilbert

Chief Executive Officer, Aberdeen Asset Management

“Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott have written an important and highly read- able analysis of the problem that most governments and corporations would prefer to ignore. A lot of us are going to live a lot longer than our grandparents — indeed, more than half of today’s kids will live to be 100. This has implications for much more than just our personal finances. Our entire lives, they argue convinc- ingly, will need to be reconfigured to deal with the unprecedented lifespans we are being granted. Required reading for baby boomers and millennials alike.”

Niall Ferguson

Laurence A.Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University

“This is a timely, fascinating and thought provoking book, full of wonderful information about the potential of a 100-year life. A bril- liant read for individuals but it should be mandatory reading for our politicians and those responsible for planning in health and social care.”

Shirley Cramer CBE

Chief Executive, Royal Society for Public Health

“A life-time that lasts a century is a gift that few of us are prepared for. It will force all of us to change the way we plan and live every facet of life. Societies will have to transform and this thought provoking book by Professors Gratton and Scott will compel leaders to think hard about how organisations can adapt to this change and make the most of it.”

N. Chandrasekaran

Chief Executive Officer, Tata Consultancy Services

“In ‘The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity’ Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton dissect the phenomenon of an ever increasing life span along a remarkable number of aspects. Building on an in depth review of past and present demographic forecasts, they question the three life stages of education-work-retirement which our societies are still resting on. This is an exciting book that takes as far beyond the discussion of longevity in the context of social security systems and pension age. It explores life and society as it unfolds in the next couple of decades and takes us in a world that feels quite different and is yet so close. This is a most interesting read for all those who like to, or have to think a generation ahead.”

Dr. Martin Moehrle

Associate Director, CORPORATE SERVICES, EFMD

Press Coverage

Please contact Tina Schneidermann if you’d like to interview Andrew Scott or Lynda Gratton.

  • Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s recent article in MIT Sloan Management Review is an important piece about the inconsistent corporate response to increased longevity. Read the article here.

  • Lynda Gratton spoke to Jeff Brown from Read to Lead postcasts. You can listen to the podcast here.

  • Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s work on the 100-year life is referenced in article on The rise of encore careers: why over-50s are changing patterns of working life, which appeared in The Guardian on 28 November 2016.

  • Lynda Gratton was in Japan in October for the launch of The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in Age of Longevity, and spoke to NHK. Online coverage of the launch interview with Lynda Gratton here.

  • Another post by Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott has just been published on HRB’s blog: What Younger Workers Can Learn from Older Workers – and Vice Versa

     

  • Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s blog post Our Assumptions about Old and Young Workers are Wrong was published today in Harvard Business Review.

  • Andrew Scott contributed an article to CapX about what happens when we all live to 100.

  • As the The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity launched in Japan last week, Yoku Ishikura, an old friend of Lynda’s, published this blog about it : http://yokoishikura.com/?p=20078

  • Lynda Gratton talked to HR Magazine about adult-to-adult work relationships in multi-stage lives. You can read the article here.

  • CEO Magazine published a guest post by Andrew Scott on the implications of increasing longevity for the individual as well as for HR policies.

  • In a podcast with Roger P. Whitney, aka as the Retirement Answer Man, Andrew Scott explains why longevity makes retirement a whole new game.

  • Coverage of The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity, in Toyo Keitai Online – you can read the article here. Official launch later this month.

  • Lynda Gratton spoke to David Stachowiak from Coaching for Leadership: 266: How to Lead a 100-Year Life. Listen to the podcast here.

  • Web.com Small Business Forum recommends three must-read books for small business owners, and The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity is one of them. You can read the review here.

  • Andrew Scott contributes to BBC programme on the changing nature of retirement and discusses whether retirement is over. You can listen to the programme here.

     

  • Andrew Scott spoke to Steve Sanduski about the changing nature of financial planning due to increased longevity. You can listen to it here.

  • Joanne Frearson from Business Reporter spoke to Lynda Gratton about how living – and working – for longer will radically change employment. You can read the article here.

  • Peter Vanham, Senior Media Manager, World Economic Forum, has written an article about The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity, as part of a leadership series from the World Economic Forum’s Global Leadership Fellows programme.

     

  • The BBC covers Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity in an article about ageing well possibly being about never retiring.

  • Within less than 24 hours of being posted, Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s article, Our life in three stages – school, work, retirement – will not survive much longer, attracted 250+ comments.

  • Read Bloomberg View article by Justin Fox on what increased longevity means for different parts of the working population.

  • Katie Lobosco from CNN Money interviewed Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott about working and retiring in the new reality of living longer. You can read the interview here.

     

  • Lynda Gratton was interviewed by Richard Aedy, from ABC (Australia National Broadcasting). They talked about The 100-Year Life. 

  • From the announcement: “Finally, in The 100-Year Life, Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott tackle the question of how our lives, relationships, careers and institutions will have to change as more people live to 100.” The short list will be announced on 7 September.

  • Listen to interview with Andrew Scott on Australia’s ABC Radio National Breakfast.

  • Sydney Morning Herald featured an extract of The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity. You can read it here.

  • Lynda Gratton was interviewed by Catherine Fox for The Australian. Read and watch the interview here.

  • Skip Prichard Leadership Insights covered The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity through a Q&A session with Andrew Scott. You can read it here.

  • In a Curious Minds podcast Gayle Allen speaks to Lynda Gratton about the 100-year life. You can listen to it here.

  • New Scientist has reviewed The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity, and you can read it here.

  • Rowan Hooper, special contributor to Japan Times and news editor for New Scientist Magazine wrote article in Japan Times about the need to rethink the age-old question of youth.

  • Business features editor Tom Welsh writes about the implications of the increasing longevity on investment referencing Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s new book, The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity. You can read his article here.

  • During a recent trip to Paris, Lynda Gratton met with Muriel Jasor, Editor in Chief of Les Echos Business. You can read Muriel Jasor’s article here.

  • Rachel Rickard Straus interviewed Andrew Scott about how to prepare for the 100-year life and what to do with the longer working life. You can watch the interview here.

  • Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott spoke at an event in the HR in the Boardroom series, hosted by HR Magazine. Deputy Editor Jenny Roper captured the key insights in this article.

  • The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity was covered in Vedomosti, a Russian language business daily. You can access the article here.

  • Chicago Tribune referred to Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s work on the 100-year life in a recent article about how to make career transitions and keeping a healthy relationship.

  • Andrew Scott was interviewed by Martin Bamford for Informed Choice Radio. You can listen to the podcast here.

  • Andrew Hill from The Financial Times picks his books of the year so far, and The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity is high up on the list.

  • Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton were interviewed about the need to prepare for a longer life. Read the article in The National.

  • Lynda Gratton writes in City A.M. about the many advantages of breaking the silos of age. Read the article here.

  • Harvard Business Review (online) has published an article about the 100-year life by Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott.

  • Editor Silvia Ascarelli from Dow Jones MarketWatch interviewed Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton when they were in New York to launch The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity. Read Silvia’s article ‘What would your 90-year-old self tell you to change today?’

  • Fortune’s Rick Wartzman refers to The 100-Year Life in a recent article about what America’s ageing workforce means for the future of work.

  • Gwen Moran from Fast Company spoke to Lynda Gratton and wrote an article about how companies need to consider the implications of the 100-year life.

  • Jane Street-Porter and Lynda Gratton spoke about the new perspective on ageing that the 100-year life offers. Read this article about Jane Street-Porter’s thoughts about ageing based on the conversation.

  • Simon Caulkin writes about The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity in London Business School Review. You can read the article here.

  • The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity was covered in an article in The Sunday Times – read it here. Bryan Appleyard writes: “Ignore every other political, social or personal issue that grabs your attention; this is the big one. It will affect every aspect of life, from love and friendship to work. Two basic models of life have already been broken by death’s flight, many more are now being tested to destruction.”

  • Andrew  Scott talks about why he and Lynda Gratton wrote The 100-Year Life, how working on the book made him think about his own life and how prepared he is for a longer life. You can read the interview here.

  • Michael Skapinker covers The 100-Year Life: Living an Working in an Age of Longevity in an article on worker longevity, which he predicts will spell trouble for employers.

    He referes to the book as ‘stimulating’ and also writes “The book is full of frisky ideas about how the over-60s can live the final third of their lives, with portfolio jobs, community activism and cross-generational friendships.”

    You can read the full article here.

  • Mrs Moneypenny has read The 100-Year Life and found that ‘The book does an excellent job of bringing together in a coherent way all the points to consider in a long career — health, wealth and competencies.” Read her piece here.

  • Pete Mockaitis from How to Be Awesome at Your Job talked to Lynda Gratton about the 100-Year Life. You can listen to it here.

  • Rik Kirkland, Senior Managing Editor of McKinsey Publishing, interviewed Lynda Gratton about the 100-year life and what it means to individuals and companies. You can read and watch the interview here.

     

  • Ian Wylie from Management Today talked to Lynda Gratton about The 100-Year Life and how to prepare. You can read the interview here.

  • The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in and Age of Longevity was reviewed in People Management. You can read the review here.

  • The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity has been reviewed by The Economist. You can read it here.

  • City A.M. features an article by Andrew Scott about increasing life expectancy and how society as well as individuals need to address the implications.

  • Emma De Vita from The Financial Times writes about interim working and interviewed Lynda Gratton: “As work changes, more of us should expect to have a stage of our career where we take on work for specific periods of time, especially as work is increasingly set up for tasks not jobs, says Professor Lynda Gratton of London Business School.”

    You can read the full article here.

  • Judith Woods from The Telegraph spoke to Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott about their new book, and in today’s paper she writes “A hugely fascinating, thought-provoking (if resolutely upbeat) examination of the seismic shifts that will – must – occur as the population ages.” You can read the full article here.

  • Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s work is referred to in this HBR online article about next-generation retirement and how this means different things to different people.

  • On 19 May, Andrew Scott discussed the implications for the individual and business of the 100-year life  on Business Breakfast, a Dubai Eye show. You can listen to the interview here.

  • Simon Kuper from The Financial Times covers The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity and refers to it as a ‘crucial book’. Read the article here.

  • Emma Jacobs from The Financial Times references Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton’s book, The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity, in her recent article “Still dancing, my mother pioneers a quickstep to ageing”.

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  • The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity was covered in a recent article in Dubai Chronicle. Andrew Scott explains how the increase in longevity will encourage fundamental changes to how we live and work. Read the article here.

  • At a recent media roundtable lunch in Hong Kong, Andrew Scott talked to journalists about why Millennials tending to commence their careers later or take ‘gap’ at various points in their career are in fact wisely preparing themselves for a much longer working life. China Morning Post captured key points of the conversation in this article.

  • The Guardian’s Larry Elliott writes about working longer, inspired by the Queen who at 90 is still working. He references Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott’s new book, The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity. Read the article here.

  • Andrew Scott on the Club Sandwich Generation

    Emma Jacobs from The Financial Times talked to Andrew Scott about the Club Sandwich Generation who is juggling work and caring for grandchildren. You can read more here.

  • Andrew Scott spoke about The 100-Year Life on RTHK

    Andrew Scott was interviewed about our new book, The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity on RTHK earlier this week. Listen to the interview here.

  • The 100-Year Life on CNBC in Asia

    Andrew Scott talked to CNBC in Asia on the 100-Year Life.
    Click here to view and discover the short-term and long-term implications of increased longevity

  • You need to plan for the impact of the 100-year life right now. This article by Claer Barrett explains just some of the reasons.

  • Lynda Gratton spoke at a panel “What If: You Are Still Alive in 2100?” at the World Economic Forum in Davos this year.  Nancy Gibbs, Time Magazine, wrote about it online and you can watch it here.

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The Book

In The 100-Year Life – Living and Working in an Age of Longevity, published June 2nd 2016 by Bloomsbury Publishing, Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott outline the challenges and intelligent choices that all of us, of any age, need to make in order to turn greater life expectancy into a gift and not a curse. This is not an issue for when we are old but an urgent and imminent one.

Extremely well received by critics and readers alike, the book has received extensive coverage around the world.

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